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How To/Pro-Tips

Preserving Old Wood:  There are several ways to keep wood stocks on firearms protected.  The first thing is moisture content.  Many of these old weapons have been around for over 100 years and they did just fine in the days before air conditioning.  If you have a weapon that has spent its life in the south, however, and you pack up and move to the high desert of Utah, then the wood could start to dry out and crack.  In those situations a wood moisturizer should be considered.  A generous application left to sit for a few hours will absorb what the wood needs.  Wipe the excess off with a clean cloth and then follow-up every month at first to see if the wood has continued to dry.  If so, repeat every month or so until the wood no longer absorbs the moisturizer.  Other than that, my recommendation is to leave the wood and its original finish alone.  Applying other wood oils only traps dirt.  

 

Treating Small Dings and Scratches in Wood:  If you have a scratch in wood you can use either a wax pencil that is colored brown or a stain marker.  I prefer the stain markers by Minwax and use Red Mahogany.  Just apply it as if you were highlighting the scratch, let is absorb for 10 seconds or so, and then wipe it thoroughly with a clean, dry cloth.  It blends quickly and works breat.

 

What type of oil for firearms:  The type of oil to use is about as personal a preference as the type of truck someone drives.  Personally, I like light machine-type oils that do not have a tendency to dry over time in clumps.  Heavier oils can also attract and retain dust.  If you can ever get your hands on an old bottle of Singer Sewing Machine Oil, then that is the best!  Absent that, I use Nyoil.  Great as both a lubricant and preservative.

 

Treating Leather:  Pecard Leather Dressing is the best product I am aware of.  Neutral color so it only acts to treat the leather itself, not color it. 




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